War on Drugs – Nursingthesis Help

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The War on Drugs began in 1971 when President Nixon declared drug abuse as “public enemy number one” and increased federal funding for drug-control efforts. In Chapter 1, the text cites “the drug war has actually done more harm than problematic drug use itself,” according to the Drug Policy Alliance (2017). 

Review this article – War on Drugs (Links to an external site.)

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And watch this video –Drug Policy Alliance. (Links to an external site.)

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Then read or watch at least one other source providing information or an opinion on the impact of the War on Drugs.

The text stresses that “substance use counselors must see their work in terms of social justice” and identifies 3 domains in which advocacy might take place (individual, school or community, larger public arena). The War on Drugs has created a plethora of social problems. Pick one and and provide a response indicating how you could advocate for client rights in each of the 3 domains.  

Be sure to reference at least 2 sources in your response. 

Reminders: 

For each module, students are expected to post an original response to each discussion topic provided by the instructor .  This module only requires one original response and two peer responses. Original responses should be at least 10 sentences and peer responses should be at least 4 sentences. 

 

 

 

NOTE

 

PLEASE RESPOND TO THIS TWO STUDENTS 

FIRST STUDENT

  1. If a client is heading toward the path of being incarcerated I could advocate for him individually by looking and asking for them to find help in harm reduction facilities such as one presented in the video  (Links to an external site.)by Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell.  In the video, he describes harm reduction facilities in the Netherlands and how that dropped the addiction rate of heroin. These facilities allowed for safe drug use to help patients focus on their well-being and what they could do to improve their overall future instead of focusing on their addiction. At a school or community level, I could advocate by fighting for my client to receive help from either a school they attend or any other community organization. I would advocate for them to find or to be placed in a “safe house”, as described by NBC News (2019). There they would be able to slowly dwindle down on their drug use and be able to hopefully make a full recovery off of whatever substance they’re addicted to. On a wider public scale, I would advocate for the less harsh and less mandatory punishments for small-scale possession of certain drugs. This would allow for the energy to be put towards the bigger picture of helping those already incarcerated or those in need of rehabilitation. The demand for illicit drugs is going to keep going up. No matter what the government does the demand is always going to be there. The main issue to focus on then is the treatment of those who are in dire need of treatment and rehabilitation. 

SECOND STUDENT

The war on drugs led state and local municipalities to divert federal resources from educational and social programs, that would have lowered citizen incarceration rates and the school-to-prison pipeline, to prison- building practices that increased citizen incarceration rates. I would pursue advocacy through a state and local organization like the Maryland Alliance for Justice Reform (MAJR) to make changes at the legislative and policy level to address inequities in schools, communities, and state and local areas public that prevent crime, lower incarceration rates and create correctional practices to support alternatives to incarceration (Source: Maryland Alliance for Justice Reform www.ma4jr.org (Links to an external site.)). Advocating for funding community outreach programs like Citizens on Patrol and Neighborhood Watch and community crime prevention programs like “National Night Out” and Neighborhood D.A.R.E., where citizens play a pivotal role in preventing crime in their neighborhoods, help influence the reduction of crime rates, especially with juveniles (Source: Maryland Community Crime Prevention Institute). To address school and community issues, I would advocate for additional federal and state resources for school mentoring programs for at-risk youth or community mentoring programs like Big Brothers and Big Sisters and 100 Black Men to influence positive youth outcomes, preventing youth involvement in the juvenile justice system and crime in schools (school-to-prison pipeline) and communities. Advocacy on the policy level, where impact would reach the large public arena, would emphasizes rehabilitation and restorative justice over mass incarceration and punishment in Maryland’s criminal justice system. (Source: Maryland Alliance for Justice Reform www.ma4jr.org (Links to an external site.)). I would also advocate for additional focus and resources to education and social programs such as Prison Scholar Fund, where incarcerated inmates have access to education and opportunities to learn a skill to help transition back into society and programs to ensure returning citizens are fully supported in finding treatment, jobs, and housing.

 

 

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